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TTRNO's Thruxton Cup Bike - Suspension

By Maxwell Materne
on May 28, 2015

Racing a bone stock Triumph Thruxton isn’t ideal, not even in the Thruxton Cup, but I made a plan for the season and I’m sticking with it!  I’m only making modifications one at a time so that I know EXACTLY what’s making me faster.  Last race the bike was bone stock, this time suspension was the name of the game.  The best options for the Thruxton Cup, Traxxion Dynamics AK-20 cartridges in the front forks and Gazi Hyper X rear shocks was what I went with.  I showed up to the track the morning of the race with nothing installed… not a good start, but quickly threw my bike on the lift and swapped out the forks and shocks just in time to miss the last practice session.  At this point my first ride on new / un-tuned suspension would be the F2 race against a gaggle of Suzuki SV650s.  The bike felt good but not great, smooth but not planted and quicker but actually wasn’t.  I WAS 2 SECONDS SLOWER!  I got all the trick stuff, but didn’t do any better.  There were 2 things that contributed to this; I didn’t practice and shake off the cobwebs, but more importantly, I didn’t tune my suspension!  Throwing on expensive “go-fast” gadgets is what most motorcycle riders do, thinking that by simply having the things that the fast guys have they will become a fast guy.  Without tuning my performance suspension the bike was just as unruly as with stock suspension, it simply felt better because I was going slower.

 

About an hour after my first race of the day was the main event, the Thruxton Cup race.  I set my suspension to a baseline setting, that I came up with by jumping up and down on it, then headed out for my warm-up lap.   I lined up on the grid next to Doug Polen, the ‘91 - ‘92 World Superbike champion and ‘93 AMA Superbike champion.  That’s the exact moment when my heart sank.  I was in the presence of a legend, competing with a legend, and on a bike that was stock all except for the suspension, which might as well have been stock.

 

The green flag dropped and I had a great start, ended up in the middle of the pack and was able to gain a few positions as the turns flew by.  The bike felt a lot more planted this time and I was able to pick up throttle sooner without upsetting the chassis.  When there is someone to chase the laps seem go by faster and with Doug Polen in my sights the race was over before I realized.  I started in 17th position and finished in 4th behind a world champion and two national champions, overall not too shabby.  

 

The results were great, but I needed to get this suspension dialed in if I’m going to collect more gold.  That’s when I turned to my good friend Dave Moss from FeelTheTrack.com.  In the videos below he explains what my suspension baseline settings were after I finished this race:


Now that we know where I am starting it’s time to do some live tuning on the track.  Below is a video of how he adjusted my suspension as I came in from each practice session to end up with the perfect setup for me.  



Max Materne's Thruxton Cup bike settings:

 

  • Forks flush with the upper triple clamp
  • Traxxion Dynamics fork kit
  • 0.90 front springs
  • Preload at zero (all the way counter clockwise)
  • Rebound .25 of a turn out from maximum
  • Compression 1.25 turns out form maximum
  • Shock length at +2mm on ride height adjuster
  • Preload with 4 threads showing
  • Compression at 10 clicks from maximum
  • Rebound at 14 clicks from maximum
  • Font tire, Continental Road Attack II Evo
  • Rear tire, Bridgestone BT-003 RS
  • Cold starting pressures, 30F, 28R

 

Session 1:

  • Ride the bike, assess wet track conditions and get the tires and suspension oil hot. Come in at the end of the session and assess carcass temps and suspension.
  • changes shock preload to get some static sag
  • change shock rebound as it was too slow
  • change fork rebound as it was too slow
  • remove 2psi from the front tire
  • remove 1psi from the rear tire

 

Session 2:

  • Ride for 4 laps and come in to assess carcass temps and fork travel as the track was drying
  • fork travel bottomed out so preload added
  • shock rebound still to slow so damping removed

 

Settings by lunch

  • Forks flush with the upper triple clamp
  • Preload at two turns in
  • Rebound .75 of a turn out from maximum
  • Compression 1.5 turns out form maximum
  • Shock length at +2mm on ride height adjuster
  • Preload with 4 threads showing
  • Compression at 10 clicks from maximum
  • Rebound at 18 clicks from maximum

 

Session 3:

  • Dry track so focus on braking and flickability in the esses section for 4 laps and come in.
  • change fork preload to 4 turns in
  • fork compression to 1.25 turns out
  • fork rebound to 1 turn out
  • shock rebound to 20 clicks out
  • lower the front end by 4mm for better turn in

 

Session 4:

  • Push the bike hard on the side of the tire to test chassis stability and be aggressive in traffic
  • preload to 6.25 turns in
  • fork rebound to 1.25 turns out
  • shock compression to 5 clicks out
  • shock rebound to 19 clicks out

 

Session 5:

  • Free ride to test the bike at full pace as traffic permitted.

 

End of day settings:

  • Fork height at -4mm from the joint of the cap and tube to the upper triple clamp
  • Preload at 6.25 turns in
  • Compression at 1.25 turns out
  • Rebound at 1.25 turns out
  • Shock at +2mm ride height
  • Preload with 2 threads showing
  • Compression at 5 clicks out
  • Rebound at 19 clicks out
  • Cold tire pressures, 31F, 28R at 100* track temp

 




Now that the suspension is finally dialed in, it’s time to race the fastest guy I know… fellow Triumph dealer John Beldock from Erico Motorsports.  Stay tuned for next week’s article on how that went!



Maxwell Materne

 

Max's Race On A Stock Thruxton

By Maxwell Materne
on February 18, 2015

Waking up at 6:00 AM on race day is second nature for me now but having to dress for the chilly ride to the racetrack felt a bit strange. I have a bit of a morning ritual to my race days: alarm goes off, I snooze 3 to 4 times, then roll out of bed right into my Moto D under suit. A few more layers of clothes as my coffee brews and out the door to walk to work where the company van is parked. This time however it was different as I walked downstairs and hopped right onto my “race bike.” Only thing is my race bike has a license plate, turn signals, headlight and taillight, even a horn. She’s really not a race bike at all but that doesn’t mean I wasn’t going to ride the pants off of her.



As I crossed over the Mississippi River my mind drifted to what this bone-stock Triumph Thruxton would be capable of. Stock suspension meant a bouncy ride, diminished traction and less control. Some people were calling me crazy to even try to go fast on it. The foot pegs were stock with the “feeler pegs” still on, meaning they were closer to the ground than any other Thruxton Cup bike. My lean angle would be significantly diminished and when hard parts hit the ground it would throw my bike into a cycle of uncontrollable bounces. I started to worry myself, I started to think this may be crazy, more importantly I was certain I would lose. As I passed Bayou Segnette the air became wet, cold and dense. The bike seemed to like it, it pulled strong, throttle response felt crisp even though she was only 62hp, almost 10 hp under the rest of the grid. My fingers felt like frozen blocks of wood, lifeless and rigid, as I pulled in the clutch and applied the brakes to check in at the NOLA Motorsports security gate. The last leg of the journey is simply riding across the paddock on the way to registration, honking and waving to all of the friendly faces I’ve spent the last 2 years racing with. I walked up to registration still shivering from the ride but was met by the warmest welcome from all of the WERA officials. My story, “Birth of a Thruxton Cup Bike”, had reached them and they were excited to see how this race turned out. At first I was flattered, then the butterflies kicked in.




Now back at the TTRNO Speed Shop garage to make the transformation from street bike to race bike! I took off the mirrors and license plate, taped up the lights and I was done…that’s it...I was determined to keep it simple, keep it stock. I rode it to the tech inspector and explained my story. He passed me with a bit of skepticism, but wished me the best of luck. By the time I got into my leathers I had already wasted too much time to make it to practice, so my first fast ride would be a race.






Race 6 was my first race of the day, it was Formula 2, mostly Suzuki SV650s, I was using it as practice to see what would fail me first. Before I knew it I was on my warmup lap, trying to to get a little heat in my tires. I pull up to my grid position...row 3...center. I look to the left where spectators have lined up against the cement wall waiting for the launch. They look perplexed and a bit surprised to see a stock bike on the grid. Tall bars, turn signals and a big ugly tail light make it look like I’m on my way to the grocery store so I verify their suspicion with a honk and a wave. The 2 board comes out at the start/finish tower indicating that the last rider is in position for the launch. 1board,1boardsideways,greenflag. That fast, the race has started, I’m at 6,000RPM as I feather the clutch out to launch as quickly as possible while keeping the front wheel just an inch or so off of the tarmac. 2nd gear, 3rd gear, 4th gear, I’m in the lead. The 300 ft board flies by and I’m on the binders at the 200. It’s just after turn 2 when a pair of the more powerful SV650s take the inside line, soon after a 3rd passes. From here on out I hold position as I try to figure out my bike. The suspension is bouncy but not as bad as I thought, in fact the smoother I am with my bodyweight transitions and throttle applications the less I even notice it. When the foot pegs catch the ground it’s jarring. The bike feels as if it lifts slightly, loses traction and begins a cycle of rhythmic bounces front and rear suspension. I hang off of the bike farther using the high tall bars to push myself away and the bike seems to like it. It wiggles but complies with my requests and finishes the turn right where I want it. This is what breaking a wild horse must feel like. I’m letting it try to buck me off but with just the right inputs it abides. The pegs hit a few more times until the “feeler pegs” finally break off. Every lap is faster as I get used to how the bike moves and likes to be handled. Fastest lap is 2:11.159 as I pass under the checkered flag finishing 2nd in a race I didn’t even plan on being competitive in. I ride back to my garage, put on tire warmers then try to contain my excitement for the real reason I’m here, the Thruxton Cup.

 

Before I know it I hear “3rd and final call for race 9.” Frantically I put in ear plugs (needed around all of those loud Thruxton Cup bikes), throw on my brand new Bell Star Carbon helmet (I’ll brag about that one soon enough) and squeeze my hands into gloves. Off with the tire warmers and onto pit out. I feel at home knowing the grid is filled with bikes just like mine, a bit more tricked out but with the same DNA. I have pole position for Thruxton Cup since I won the regional championship last year but we share the track with a few more classes in front of us.Photo Credit: Zayas Image That puts all of us British hooligans at row 9 and back. Same as before the boards go flying by and the green flag has been thrown. Walt Bolton, #552, has an amazing start along with Paul Canale ,#112. They are ahead of me instantly and lead the way into turn 1. I hit traffic from the classes that started ahead of me, so the gap is now getting larger. That’s it, I can’t let this happen, not even 1/8 of the way around the track and they’re almost out of sight. I change my approach into turn 2 by turning in later for a deeper apex and more drive past the blockade of bikes keeping me from the other Photo Credit: Zayas ImageThruxtons, and it works. I pass 3 riders all before the braking zone of turn 3 and with Walt’s rear tire in my sights I brake later than I ever have setting me up for an overtaking of #552 entering the turn and an overtaking of #112 exiting. Turn 4 approaches and I’ve already upshifted to 3rd gear and back down to 4th within a matter of seconds. The tire chirps and steps out as a tip into the right hander all while being certain Paul will overtaking me on the inside, but he wasn’t there. Turn after turn I never look back, I’m yelling in my helmet. The bump in turn 7 sends me wide over the rumble strips and I yell “YeeHaa!” (cheesy as all hell but true). My smile fills every bit of the visor making it almost difficult to see through my squinting eyes. Lap after lap I get more comfortable. The bike wallows and slides and grinds parts off but it feels like it was meant to do this. As I turn laps my mind drifts to what this bike’s life was before. 8,082 miles of weekend rides, maybe a few rides to work, maybe a 2-up date night ride, a few bike nights, maybe a poker run or two. I’m giving this bike a whole new life, a new chapter and both the bike and I are loving every second of it. As I come down the front straight the last time I lay on my horn in celebration, look to the right and see the rest of the riders way behind, 27 seconds behind to be exact. I had consistently run low 2:08s where the lap record for a fully race prepped Thruxton Cup bike is 2:04 flat.

Photo Credit: Zayas ImageThen it hits me, I’ve been planning on writing these articles to say how this bike is pretty good stock but desperately needs additions to really enjoy it on the track, but I was dead wrong. Sure I’m still going to upgrade suspension, exhaust, tuning, etc. but it’s not necessary at all to go out, have fun and kick some ass!

The sun rises on the second day revealing that the track is soaking from an overnight storm, it’s going to be a wet race. This time Paul Canale’s not racing but my brother, Zach, is. Zach and I line up next to each other on the grid and both of us have a great launch. Lap 1, lap 2, lap 3 and Zach is right on my tail, our times are slower due to the conditions but we’re sliding the rear tire through turns as we lose then regain traction. The race between Zach and me becomes simply one of endurance, who can hold on to our sliding pace longer. I finally pull away in the last lap and take gold one more time.
Photo Credit: Zayas Image
What makes someone fast is not what they ride, but how they ride it. How willing they are to push. How late they brake and how early they twist the throttle. How smooth they are and how they respond to all of the little bits of data the bike sending back to them. Photo Credit: Zayas Image

I’m not done with this bike yet, next thing up is suspension. If I plan on beating the Thruxton Cup lap record at NOLA I’ll need to have more control than I currently have. There are many options out there and I’ll be doing my research to make sure I’ve got the best available.

Follow my progress, as we have miles and miles, and laps and laps to go

Maxwell Materne

   

 

                                                                                          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Credit: Zayas Image

 

 

 

 


Understanding suspension | Upgrading your Triumph modern classic

By Maxwell Materne
on December 04, 2014

The point of a motorcycle’s suspension is to both absorb the road’s imperfections and keep consistent traction with the asphalt.  But how does it work?

To understand the principles of suspension there are 2 different things to discuss: springs and damping.  The springs used in both front forks and in rear shocks are the same type of coil springs you would find in a pen or in a mattress, just much stronger.   What prevents the spring from continuously oscillating is the suspension’s damping characteristics.  

Let’s look at a VERY simplified diagram how suspension works:


 

 

 

There are 3 main components in this image to pay attention to; the oil, the valve and the damper rod.  The valve is on the end of the damper rod and is pushed through the oil as the damper rod is moved up and down.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



As we push the damper rod up into the shock we can see that oil is passing through the valve.  The rate at which this oil passes through the valve is determined by the size of the holes in the valve and by the viscosity of the oil.

 

 

 

 

 










 

 

 

 

The effect is the same in reverse for most stock shocks like those found on the Triumph Bonneville.  With shocks like these the rate at which the valve plunges through the oil is not adjustable nor can the oil be changed in order to get a different amount of damping from the shock.  








 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now let’s add the spring into the mix.  For every action (hitting a bump and the shock compressing) there is an equal but opposite reaction (the spring returning to its original length - rebounding).  


Let’s discuss the Triumph modern classic line specifically.  The Bonneville, Scrambler and T100 have absolutely no adjustability while the Thruxton only has fork preload adjustability.  Preload is the amount of tension that is put onto the springs in order compensate for rider weight.  Our TTRNO Level 1 suspension package addresses the issue of preload adjustability and spring rate.  


TTRNO’s Level 1 suspension kit for Triumph Modern Classics consists of:

  • Preload adjustable front fork caps
  • Progressive fork springs
  • Hagon preload adjustable rear shocks


Preload adjustability is the first step in getting a motorcycle set up for you, but this Level 1 kit goes a step above by installing a spring with a progressive rate.  Let’s discuss spring rates…

 



The above spring is a standard flat-rate spring.  These springs are  used in stock applications because they are cheap to produce and easy to tune.  They work great for setting up a bike for the track, but are not ideal for a comfortable street ride.  That’s where the progressive springs come in…

 

 

Progressive springs are wound at a different rate throughout the length of the spring.  This allows for an increase in suspension “stiffness” as more force is applied.  On the road this allows for small bumps to be absorbed under a very light spring rate and more aggressive bumps to be controlled at a higher rate.  In other words, a soft ride without bottoming out.  

Suspension level 1 price with parts and installation $920.




TTRNO’s Level 2 suspension kit for Triumph Modern Classics consists of:

  • Preload adjustable front fork caps
  • Rider weight specific flat-rate springs
  • RaceTech Gold Valve front fork cartridge emulators
  • Ohlins S36DR1L shocks


What makes Level 2’s components more advanced is the ability to adjust not only the spring preload but also the rebound damping.  Remember how damping is controlled by the valve on the damper rod?  Well, the rate at which the shock compresses and rebounds can be tuned by the size of the orifices in the valve.  RaceTech’s Gold Valve kit is able to tune both compression and rebound damping by both changing the size and shape of the valve orifices and by changing a series of shims that sit on both sides of the valve.  These shims help tune damping by their rate of deflection as fork oil passes them.  For simplicity’s sake I’ll leave it to RaceTech to explain the rest:  http://www.racetech.com/page/title/Emulators-How%20They%20Work.


The rear shocks for Level 2 are made by the world-famous Ohlins suspension company.  They are preload, rebound and height adjustable with larger and more advanced valves than those used in Level 1’s Hagon shocks.  Adjustability is externally done meaning that changes in road conditions can be tuned quickly and easily.  

Suspension level 2 price with parts and installation $2,300.





TTRNO’s Level 3 suspension kit for Triumph Modern Classics consists of:

  • Traxxion Dynamics AK-20 Axxion cartridge kit for front forks
  • Rider weight specific flat-rate springs
  • Ohlins S36PR1C1LB shocks


The set of components in Level 3 is all you need to make your suspension FULLY adjustable with preload, rebound and compression.  One of the largest advantages of the AK-20 cartridge kits is that rebound and compression damping can be externally controlled unlike that of the RaceTech Gold Valve kit.  This allows suspension tuning to be as simple as turning a few screws rather than taking apart the front forks.  Ohlins’ S36PR1C1LB shocks have an external “piggy back” reservoir to keep oil temperature and viscosity consistent.  All of the adjusters on these shocks are a simple turn of a knob with no need for difficult spanner wrenches and the damping control is so intricate that any and all traction characteristics can be tuned perfectly.  The amount of adjustability provided in this kit is the same as that of full factory race bikes and these components are by far the best on the market.  Take it from me, if you want the best suspension components on your Triumph Modern Classic, this is the kit!

Suspension level 3 price with parts and installation $3,900.



Maxwell Materne

2014 WERA Thruxton Cup National Champion

 

Back to Tech Center

Triumph Updates Modern Classic Range for 2014

By Zachary Materne
on October 04, 2013

Bonneville SE

The 2014 Bonneville Special Edition boasts a paint scheme inspired by one of the last Meriden models off the line in 1982, the T140w TSS. The distinctive Jet Black and Lunar Silver paintwork creates a unique-looking Bonneville, with black livery on the tank and side panels (with twin, hand-painted gold coach lines), while the front and rear mudguards are painted silver with jet black centre stripes and gold coach lines. The Special Edition also sports the new detailing on the cylinder head cooling fins, solid black oil cooler lines and a throatier sounding silencer.
•Distinctive new paint scheme
•Hand-painted coach lines
•Redesigned silencer
•New cylinder cooling fins
•Color: Jet Black with Twin Gold Coach Lines
$9.799

 

Thruxton

The Thruxton oozes retro racing style, with its unmistakable 865cc twin-cylinder engine and aluminum rims, an enthusiast's riding position and adjustable rear suspension. Triumph's cafe racer also benefits from revised megaphone si lencers for an even more liberated sound. A color-matched flyscreen, with center stripe detail, joins the seat cowl as standard equipment.
•Revised megaphone silencers
•Color matched fly screen
•Center stripe
•Seat cowl
•Colors: Phantom Black; Brooklands Green
$9.099

 

Scrambler

The Scrambler gets a "back to black" treatment on the oil cooler lines, handlebars, wheel rims and hubs, plus the rear master cylinder reservoir cover. A new seat design with an embossed logo adds to the attitude, while a clear, anodized bash plate provides protection from gravel and rocks.
•Black rims, hubs, handlebars
•New seat design
•Anodized bash plate
•Colors: Matte Pacific Blue; Lunar Silver/Diablo Red
$9.099

 

Bonneville T100 Black

The TlOO Black offers a mean and moody look with its striking Jet Black color scheme, made even more distinctive with the addition of black-finished wheel rims, hubs, handlebars, RSU springs, mudguard stays, mirrors and grab rail. The Jet Black bike also sounds off with a more compelling voice, thanks to its revised silencer, while the machined detail on the cooling fins is offset beautifully by the black engine finish.
•Back in black ...Jet Black everywhere
•New exhaust tones
•New cylinder cooling fins
$8.999

 

Bonneville T100

With a nod to its 1960s heritage, the new TlOO offers a Crystal White and Aurum Gold paint scheme, inspired
by the 1964 Bonneville, with the stylized color split carrying across the front and rear mudguards. Like the
Bonneville, the TlOO gets a throatier exhaust and the same machined detailing on the cylinder head cooling
fins. A standard chrome grab rail and chain guard add a classy finishing touch.
•Heritage paint scheme
•Throatier exhaust
•New cylinder cooling fins
·Chrome grab rail
•Chrome chain guard
•Colors: Crystal White/ Aurum Gold:
Jet Black/Cranberry Red
$9.199

 

Bonneville

The 2014 Bonneville is the ideal city bike, thanks to a rider-friendly seat height of just over 29 inches, comfortable ergonomics and a combination of easy maneuverability and retro good looks. And while the Bonneville is right at home on urban streets, its distinctive 865cc twin engine provides more than enough power for open roads. The 2014 bike boasts redesigned silencers, a distinctive new tank badge, three fresh paint combinations and distinctive new engine cooling fins.
•Redesigned silencer
•New tank badge
•Fresh paint combinations
•New cylinder cooling fins
•Blacked out oil cooler lines
•Colors: Phantom Black. Lunar Silver:
Crystal White/Sapphire Blue
$7.899 single color I $8.199 two-tone

What's Improved about the new Daytona 675?

By Nick Napoda
on February 19, 2013

With some major developments the 2013 model takes the Daytona to a new high. A redesigned engine giving improved performance and an extended rev range, plus major chassis revisions including a new frame and repositioned silencer are among the elements that keep the Daytona ahead of the competition. Redesigned, sharper bodywork complete this impressive package.


The Daytona range features an R model which has a number of enhanced specification components including Öhlins TTX rear suspension and NIX30 inverted forks, providing the R with a wide range of adjustability. Additionally the R features lighter Brembo Monobloc calipers giving precise and powerful stopping. On the Daytona R switchable ABS is standard as is a quick-shift gear change.

Daytona 675: Features and Benefits

  • Headlights are no longer “projector” style lights. Previous lights had overall good lateral lighting distance, but failed to achieve a wider projection. New headlamps achieve both
  • Air intake is increased significantly. Increased opening allows for greater intake, which thus contributes to the increased performance of the new engine.
  • With a stronger one-piece cylinder block, wider pistons and lighter titanium inlet valves the new engine has increased power, torque and rev range up to 14,400 RPM. This provides the rider with higher performance and greater flexibility
  • All new lightweight twin spar frame on the new 2013 model gives the bike lighter weight and greater agility
  • With a repositioned silencer, the bike has improved handling and agility. The silencer is positioned lower and closer to the engine of the bike, improving the weight distribution significantly
  • The 2013 Daytona features a newly designed clutch. With a slip/assist design the clutch is now lighter to operate but also offers the rider more bike control, such as preventing the rear wheel from hopping under heavy braking

By Matt Nomey

EICMA: New from Ducati, Triumph and Vespa

By Nick Napoda
on November 17, 2012

This year at EICMA, our favorite manufacturers released information on new upcoming models for 2013. We are accepting deposits on all upcoming models. 

2013 Ducati Hypermotard

 

 The new Hypermotard offers all the power of a new generation 110 HP Testastretta 11° engine with the advanced technology of Riding Modes, Power Modes and the Ducati Safety Pack. Don't put the brakes on your energy: total control and extreme versatility allow you to attack any road in Hyper style.
$11,995

2013 Ducati Hypermotard SP

 

A raised set-up, forged Marchesini rims, fully adjustable suspensions with an ultralight Marzocchi aluminium yoke and Öhlins rear shock absorber for an extraordinary dry weight of 171 kg. ABS and Ducati Traction Control as standard, so you can concentrate on having a good time. And the incredible Ducati Corse livery underlines the fact that the Hypermotard SP is an uncompromisingly sporty bike, ready to face any challenge.
$14,695 

2013 Ducati Hyperstrada

 

The Hyperstrada extends the hypermotard concept to fascinating new horizons. ABS, DTC, windshield, side bags, dedicated ergonomics and a series of touring features offering a new riding experience for everyone who loves curves, even when they're far away from home.
Hyperstrada: broaden the horizons of your emotions.
$13,295

2013 Ducati 1199 Panigale R

 

Unbelievable performance and technological excellence proclaim this the new queen of the Superbike family. Born of the world of competitive racing, the 1199 Panigale R is an exclusive and treasured interpretation of our passion for the racetrack: titanium piston rods, carbon fibre bodywork, Ducati Performance racing exhaust and livery inspired by Ducati Corse. Perfection was never so close.
$29,995

2013 Ducati Diavel Strada


The exuberance of the Diavel meets maximum comfort. Innovative solutions and dedicated accessories - side bags, windshield, new seat and raised handlebars - make the Diavel Strada ideal to dominate the asphalt on the open road. 
$19,495

Click here for our previous post on the new Multistrada models

2013 Triumph Daytona 675

The previous Daytona 675 certainly is a tough act to follow. So just how did we improve on it? The all-new triple motor is more compact, and more powerful, which allowed us to re-design the frame to be smaller, lighter and narrower than before. That, combined with a bigger airbox, new swingarm, lighter wheels and new, sharper, bodywork means we’ve succeeded in making the new Daytona 675 more agile, more responsive, and more forgiving than ever before.
$11,599 - Availal

2013 Triumph Daytona 675R

 

In the Daytona 675R, we’ve made exceptional the new standard. This is a true track day tool. Focused. Committed. And in the right hands, untouchable. The storming new triple motor delivers even more power all the way through to 14,400 rpm redline. The new frame geometry, mass centralisation and race-derived suspension enables razor sharp handling and confidence-inspiring feedback. Add brembo brakes, a quickshifter, carbon trim and some subtle styling details and you know you’re riding a true thoroughbred motorcycle.
$13,499 

2013 Triumph Street Triple (details released earlier this year)

This truly impressive middleweight street motorcycle has been acclaimed by critics around the world. The all-new 2013 model is even punchier, better balanced and more exhilarating.

The new chassis has a more dynamic specification, giving you agility and precision while keeping you planted, and better weight distribution and geometry give you an athletic, responsive ride.

The heart of the Street Triple is the throbbing 675cc triple, delivering 106PS and 68Nm of torque. It’s so good you’ll have trouble believing its only 675cc. The torque and sound of the liquid cooled 12 valve triple, combined with a close ratio six speed gearbox produce an exciting ride, and the under-engine silencer helps lower the centre gravity and improve handling.

It looks even better too, with stylish brushed metal finishes, aggressive headlights and a choice of colored coded styling accessories complementing the dark powder coated engines and frames.

$9,399

2013 Triumph Street Triple R (details released earlier this year)

 

Triumph’s engineers have honed this roadster to perfection, giving it supersport specification, suspension and brakes. With power, torque and even more excitement, this is the most fun you can have on two wheels.

Its lightweight chassis is even more dynamic, delivering greater levels of agility and precision while keeping you firmly planted. Fitted with additional adjustable front forks, an RSU with both pre-load and damping adjustment the Street Triple R offers renowned ride quality, handling and control.

The liquid cooled 12 valve triple, combined with a close ratio six speed gearbox produce an exhilarating ride, and the under-engine silencer helps lower the centre gravity and improve handling. The Nissin radial 4-piston brakes are built to match the bike’s high performance, coping easily with higher speed and rapid deceleration. And the Street Triple R features state-of-the-art Anti-Lock Brakes as standard that can cope with even the hardest braking. And because the ABS system is switchable, it can be easily deactivated whenever necessary via the instrument panel – it will then automatically re-activate when the motorbike is re-started.

The Street Triple R has distinctive good looks too, with stylish brushed metal finishes, aggressive headlights and a choice of colours complimenting the dark powder coated engine and the telltale red rear sub frame, red side radiator cowls, and red pin stripe detailing to the wheels.

The Street Triple R is not a subtle motorbike. It’s a bike with unmistakable attitude, for riders who want to take it to the max.
$9,999

 2013 Vespa 946

 

Winner of Asphalt and Rubber's "Best In Show" (beating all the motorcycles), the Vespa 946 is so distinctive it almost doesn’t look like something one can ride. It looks like it belongs at the Museum of Modern Art or the Guggenheim. Rest assured this work of art is as functional as it is beautiful. In traditional Vespa fashion, the 946 maintains the steel monocoque frame and includes aluminum elements for weight reduction and style points. The handlebar, saddle support, side panels and front mudguard are all crafted from aluminum.

For maximum safety, the 946 comes with ABS and the ASR electronic traction control. Front and rear disc brakes assuredly stop large 12-inch wheels.

The Vespa 946 also respects the environment with a 125cc three valve, electronically injected engine. The North American version will most likely come with a 150cc three valve motor but this has not been confirmed as of yet. Fuel consumption and emissions are incredibly low in this state of the art scooter. To top it all off the 946 comes with an LED headlight and turn indicators. The full LCD dashboard completes the stylish, highly technological look.
Pricing TBD

Big Kahuna Survival Guide - AMA Pro Road Racing This Weekend!

By Nick Napoda
on October 02, 2012

 

With the exciting opening of NOLA Motorsports Park, the types of sporting events the City of New Orleans can host has expanded tremendously.  Until now motorsports has been the missing link in the type of events that can find a home in our city. This week New Orleans will make sporting history when the first professionally sanctioned motorcycle race is held in our town.  The Triumph Motorcycles, AMA Pro Road Racing, Big Kahuna Nationals will take place this weekend (October 5-7) as the finale of the AMA Pro Road Racing season.  This "Super Bowl" of motorcycle racing has signed a 3 year deal with New Orleans (with an option to extend for an additional 3 years.)  In addition, New Orleans will also play host to the AMA Pro Racing Championship Banquet following the race which draws a crowd of thousands. I don't think I need to go on about what a huge opportunity this will be for the city and the state for years to come.



Personally, I have been a fan of motorcycle racing for years and have attended countless races around the country.  Because of the freshness of the sport to this region and my passion for what will happen this weekend, I thought, especially as a local ambassador for the sport, that a survival guide to motorcycle racing would come in handy for all of you so without further adieu, here it goes:


What is AMA Pro Road Racing?

Geico Motorcycle AMA Pro Road Racing is the premier motorcycle road racing series in North America.  It features the top professional motorcycle racers from America and beyond in four different classes:

National Guard SuperBike - 1000cc 4-cylinders & 1200cc twins with speeds in excess of 190mph

GoPro Daytona Sportbike - Middleweight displacement bikes with speed in excess of 175mph

Motorcycle Superstore Supersport - Middleweight displacement bikes featuring America’s up and coming stars

Vance & Hines XR1200 - Harley-Davidson spec class

What is going on during the weekend?

M1 Powersports’ & Triumph Motorcycles' Big Kahuna Nationals event’s motto is “Come for the Party and Stay for the Race”.  The weekend is not only about the exciting motorcycle racing, but the party that surrounds it.  Entertainment during the event will include live music from 10a to 1p on Saturday and Sunday, fan walk on Saturday & Sunday, Jason Britten & Eric Hoenshell’s Team No Limit Stunt Shows, fan laps,  Extreme Team 4x4 Monster Truck rides, stunt driver, Kevin Waterman’s,  attempt at driving the entire track on two wheels in his 3 series BMW sedan (with a chance for YOU to win a spot in the passenger seat), appearances by Roots of Music, Rolling Elvi, Pussy Footers, and 610 Stompers.

In addition to this great entertainment, there will be a variety of vendors and food options at the event.  NOLA Motorsports will also have two Kart rental tracks open for a little four wheeled fun.

What to bring?

This is expected to be a beautiful, sunny fall weekend so dress comfortably and wear sunscreen! I would also suggest purchasing your tickets in advance of the event.  This will help with delays entering the park (plus will get you a savings of $10 a ticket).  Tickets can be purchased in advance from TTRNO (insert link here) Great food and drink as well as grandstand seating will be available for the event.

When should you arrive?

Friday is the shortest day, and only includes practice and qualifying.  Saturday and Sunday include qualifying and racing.  If you are only attending one day, you will want to make it Saturday or Sunday.  Racing starts at 1:00pm on Saturday and 12:30pm on Sunday.  Also remember gates open at 7am on these days, so that give you plenty of time to get the lay of the land before the races begin.

I would suggest an early arrival, so you can take advantage of everything the event has to offer.

What does TTRNO have to offer during the weekend?

Triumph Motorcycles is the title sponsor of the weekend.  Triumph owners will be offered a FREE fan lap on the track at the end of Saturday and Sunday, Triumph only parking, and a full Triumph product display with clothing available for purchase next to our trackside Speed Shop.  If you have not had a chance to see our trackside Motorbike Speed Shop, this is your chance!  Our service area will be transformed into a Ducati apparel showroom. 

When does it all kick off?

The party gets started Thursday night from 6-9pm at Mardi Gras World. Join us for the biggest bike night New Orleans has seen! Attendance to the bike night is FREE and open to the public. 


Zachary U Materne
General Manager - Sales

New Orleans is Set to Host its First AMA Pro Superbike Race

By Nick Napoda
on December 23, 2011

 The AMA Pro Superbike Series will make its historic debut in New Orleans next October at NOLA Motorsports Park.  The race weekend will be October 5th – 7th, and is the last race of the 2012 season.  The AMA Pro Superbike event will be the first professional racing event held at NOLA.

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Puttin' On The Ritz With TTRNO

By Zachary Materne
on October 24, 2011

Last week TTRNO teamed up with New Orleans Mens' Store, Rubensteins and NOLA Motorsports Park for our Fall Fittings event at The Ritz-Carlton, New Orleans. It was a great night of motorsports and men's fashion.

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Triumph Teases New 2012 Models Before ECIMA

By Zachary Materne
on October 24, 2011

It is that time of year again, ECIMA time! Triumph official announced three new models to join the Triumph line-up this morning; The Triumph Tiger Explorer, Triumph Speed Triple R, and Triumph Steve McQueen Edition. The bikes will officially launch on November 8th at the ECIMA show in Milan, Italy.

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