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TTRNO Carra Custom Ducati Scrambler

By Admin Admin
on September 28, 2016

Our friends at Silodrome.com wrote this awesome blog on the newest #TTRNOCustom.  Check it out!

The new Ducati Scrambler is rapidly becoming one of the most popular modern platforms for custom motorcycle builders, as a result of its relatively affordable sticker price and its simple construction. It’s now joined the ranks of the Harley-Davidson Sportster, the Triumph Bonneville, and the Honda CB750 as a foundational model for the modern custom motorcycle community.

This particular Ducati Scrambler is perhaps a little more special than most, it was built by TTRNO out of New Orleans for a New York television producer with an eye for detail and a clear vision of what he wanted. 152 emails went back and forth containing ideas, influences, concepts, and other motorcycle builds before a final rendering was selected and work began.

The Ducati Scrambler was chosen because it’s a modern, reliable motorcycle with iconic styling and exactly the kind of sharp, punchy handling you’d want in a bike that’ll be used in a city like New York. One of the primary objectives was to strip anything off the bike that could be removed without affecting performance, in order to get kerb weight as low as possible.

The beautiful stitched leather seat was made bespoke by Karl Vosloh, the exhaust was welded up by the team at Royal-T Racing, and the freshly painted fuel tank finished the build off. The team at TTRNO decided to call their new custom the Carra Scrambler, and since its completion it’s been loaded up onto the truck and sent to its new owner in New York – so keep an eye out for it if you live in the Big Apple.

Interestingly the family team at TTRNO started out as a Vespa dealership, after a trip to Rome they’d become enamoured with scooters as an efficient means of transportation, so they set up their own dealership in New Orleans. The company has expanded significantly since then – and high-end custom motorcycle work is their newest expansion.

Thanks Silodrome!

TTRNO's Thruxton Cup Bike - Suspension

By Maxwell Materne
on May 28, 2015

Racing a bone stock Triumph Thruxton isn’t ideal, not even in the Thruxton Cup, but I made a plan for the season and I’m sticking with it!  I’m only making modifications one at a time so that I know EXACTLY what’s making me faster.  Last race the bike was bone stock, this time suspension was the name of the game.  The best options for the Thruxton Cup, Traxxion Dynamics AK-20 cartridges in the front forks and Gazi Hyper X rear shocks was what I went with.  I showed up to the track the morning of the race with nothing installed… not a good start, but quickly threw my bike on the lift and swapped out the forks and shocks just in time to miss the last practice session.  At this point my first ride on new / un-tuned suspension would be the F2 race against a gaggle of Suzuki SV650s.  The bike felt good but not great, smooth but not planted and quicker but actually wasn’t.  I WAS 2 SECONDS SLOWER!  I got all the trick stuff, but didn’t do any better.  There were 2 things that contributed to this; I didn’t practice and shake off the cobwebs, but more importantly, I didn’t tune my suspension!  Throwing on expensive “go-fast” gadgets is what most motorcycle riders do, thinking that by simply having the things that the fast guys have they will become a fast guy.  Without tuning my performance suspension the bike was just as unruly as with stock suspension, it simply felt better because I was going slower.

 

About an hour after my first race of the day was the main event, the Thruxton Cup race.  I set my suspension to a baseline setting, that I came up with by jumping up and down on it, then headed out for my warm-up lap.   I lined up on the grid next to Doug Polen, the ‘91 - ‘92 World Superbike champion and ‘93 AMA Superbike champion.  That’s the exact moment when my heart sank.  I was in the presence of a legend, competing with a legend, and on a bike that was stock all except for the suspension, which might as well have been stock.

 

The green flag dropped and I had a great start, ended up in the middle of the pack and was able to gain a few positions as the turns flew by.  The bike felt a lot more planted this time and I was able to pick up throttle sooner without upsetting the chassis.  When there is someone to chase the laps seem go by faster and with Doug Polen in my sights the race was over before I realized.  I started in 17th position and finished in 4th behind a world champion and two national champions, overall not too shabby.  

 

The results were great, but I needed to get this suspension dialed in if I’m going to collect more gold.  That’s when I turned to my good friend Dave Moss from FeelTheTrack.com.  In the videos below he explains what my suspension baseline settings were after I finished this race:


Now that we know where I am starting it’s time to do some live tuning on the track.  Below is a video of how he adjusted my suspension as I came in from each practice session to end up with the perfect setup for me.  



Max Materne's Thruxton Cup bike settings:

 

  • Forks flush with the upper triple clamp
  • Traxxion Dynamics fork kit
  • 0.90 front springs
  • Preload at zero (all the way counter clockwise)
  • Rebound .25 of a turn out from maximum
  • Compression 1.25 turns out form maximum
  • Shock length at +2mm on ride height adjuster
  • Preload with 4 threads showing
  • Compression at 10 clicks from maximum
  • Rebound at 14 clicks from maximum
  • Font tire, Continental Road Attack II Evo
  • Rear tire, Bridgestone BT-003 RS
  • Cold starting pressures, 30F, 28R

 

Session 1:

  • Ride the bike, assess wet track conditions and get the tires and suspension oil hot. Come in at the end of the session and assess carcass temps and suspension.
  • changes shock preload to get some static sag
  • change shock rebound as it was too slow
  • change fork rebound as it was too slow
  • remove 2psi from the front tire
  • remove 1psi from the rear tire

 

Session 2:

  • Ride for 4 laps and come in to assess carcass temps and fork travel as the track was drying
  • fork travel bottomed out so preload added
  • shock rebound still to slow so damping removed

 

Settings by lunch

  • Forks flush with the upper triple clamp
  • Preload at two turns in
  • Rebound .75 of a turn out from maximum
  • Compression 1.5 turns out form maximum
  • Shock length at +2mm on ride height adjuster
  • Preload with 4 threads showing
  • Compression at 10 clicks from maximum
  • Rebound at 18 clicks from maximum

 

Session 3:

  • Dry track so focus on braking and flickability in the esses section for 4 laps and come in.
  • change fork preload to 4 turns in
  • fork compression to 1.25 turns out
  • fork rebound to 1 turn out
  • shock rebound to 20 clicks out
  • lower the front end by 4mm for better turn in

 

Session 4:

  • Push the bike hard on the side of the tire to test chassis stability and be aggressive in traffic
  • preload to 6.25 turns in
  • fork rebound to 1.25 turns out
  • shock compression to 5 clicks out
  • shock rebound to 19 clicks out

 

Session 5:

  • Free ride to test the bike at full pace as traffic permitted.

 

End of day settings:

  • Fork height at -4mm from the joint of the cap and tube to the upper triple clamp
  • Preload at 6.25 turns in
  • Compression at 1.25 turns out
  • Rebound at 1.25 turns out
  • Shock at +2mm ride height
  • Preload with 2 threads showing
  • Compression at 5 clicks out
  • Rebound at 19 clicks out
  • Cold tire pressures, 31F, 28R at 100* track temp

 




Now that the suspension is finally dialed in, it’s time to race the fastest guy I know… fellow Triumph dealer John Beldock from Erico Motorsports.  Stay tuned for next week’s article on how that went!



Maxwell Materne

 

Max's Race On A Stock Thruxton

By Maxwell Materne
on February 18, 2015

Waking up at 6:00 AM on race day is second nature for me now but having to dress for the chilly ride to the racetrack felt a bit strange. I have a bit of a morning ritual to my race days: alarm goes off, I snooze 3 to 4 times, then roll out of bed right into my Moto D under suit. A few more layers of clothes as my coffee brews and out the door to walk to work where the company van is parked. This time however it was different as I walked downstairs and hopped right onto my “race bike.” Only thing is my race bike has a license plate, turn signals, headlight and taillight, even a horn. She’s really not a race bike at all but that doesn’t mean I wasn’t going to ride the pants off of her.



As I crossed over the Mississippi River my mind drifted to what this bone-stock Triumph Thruxton would be capable of. Stock suspension meant a bouncy ride, diminished traction and less control. Some people were calling me crazy to even try to go fast on it. The foot pegs were stock with the “feeler pegs” still on, meaning they were closer to the ground than any other Thruxton Cup bike. My lean angle would be significantly diminished and when hard parts hit the ground it would throw my bike into a cycle of uncontrollable bounces. I started to worry myself, I started to think this may be crazy, more importantly I was certain I would lose. As I passed Bayou Segnette the air became wet, cold and dense. The bike seemed to like it, it pulled strong, throttle response felt crisp even though she was only 62hp, almost 10 hp under the rest of the grid. My fingers felt like frozen blocks of wood, lifeless and rigid, as I pulled in the clutch and applied the brakes to check in at the NOLA Motorsports security gate. The last leg of the journey is simply riding across the paddock on the way to registration, honking and waving to all of the friendly faces I’ve spent the last 2 years racing with. I walked up to registration still shivering from the ride but was met by the warmest welcome from all of the WERA officials. My story, “Birth of a Thruxton Cup Bike”, had reached them and they were excited to see how this race turned out. At first I was flattered, then the butterflies kicked in.




Now back at the TTRNO Speed Shop garage to make the transformation from street bike to race bike! I took off the mirrors and license plate, taped up the lights and I was done…that’s it...I was determined to keep it simple, keep it stock. I rode it to the tech inspector and explained my story. He passed me with a bit of skepticism, but wished me the best of luck. By the time I got into my leathers I had already wasted too much time to make it to practice, so my first fast ride would be a race.






Race 6 was my first race of the day, it was Formula 2, mostly Suzuki SV650s, I was using it as practice to see what would fail me first. Before I knew it I was on my warmup lap, trying to to get a little heat in my tires. I pull up to my grid position...row 3...center. I look to the left where spectators have lined up against the cement wall waiting for the launch. They look perplexed and a bit surprised to see a stock bike on the grid. Tall bars, turn signals and a big ugly tail light make it look like I’m on my way to the grocery store so I verify their suspicion with a honk and a wave. The 2 board comes out at the start/finish tower indicating that the last rider is in position for the launch. 1board,1boardsideways,greenflag. That fast, the race has started, I’m at 6,000RPM as I feather the clutch out to launch as quickly as possible while keeping the front wheel just an inch or so off of the tarmac. 2nd gear, 3rd gear, 4th gear, I’m in the lead. The 300 ft board flies by and I’m on the binders at the 200. It’s just after turn 2 when a pair of the more powerful SV650s take the inside line, soon after a 3rd passes. From here on out I hold position as I try to figure out my bike. The suspension is bouncy but not as bad as I thought, in fact the smoother I am with my bodyweight transitions and throttle applications the less I even notice it. When the foot pegs catch the ground it’s jarring. The bike feels as if it lifts slightly, loses traction and begins a cycle of rhythmic bounces front and rear suspension. I hang off of the bike farther using the high tall bars to push myself away and the bike seems to like it. It wiggles but complies with my requests and finishes the turn right where I want it. This is what breaking a wild horse must feel like. I’m letting it try to buck me off but with just the right inputs it abides. The pegs hit a few more times until the “feeler pegs” finally break off. Every lap is faster as I get used to how the bike moves and likes to be handled. Fastest lap is 2:11.159 as I pass under the checkered flag finishing 2nd in a race I didn’t even plan on being competitive in. I ride back to my garage, put on tire warmers then try to contain my excitement for the real reason I’m here, the Thruxton Cup.

 

Before I know it I hear “3rd and final call for race 9.” Frantically I put in ear plugs (needed around all of those loud Thruxton Cup bikes), throw on my brand new Bell Star Carbon helmet (I’ll brag about that one soon enough) and squeeze my hands into gloves. Off with the tire warmers and onto pit out. I feel at home knowing the grid is filled with bikes just like mine, a bit more tricked out but with the same DNA. I have pole position for Thruxton Cup since I won the regional championship last year but we share the track with a few more classes in front of us.Photo Credit: Zayas Image That puts all of us British hooligans at row 9 and back. Same as before the boards go flying by and the green flag has been thrown. Walt Bolton, #552, has an amazing start along with Paul Canale ,#112. They are ahead of me instantly and lead the way into turn 1. I hit traffic from the classes that started ahead of me, so the gap is now getting larger. That’s it, I can’t let this happen, not even 1/8 of the way around the track and they’re almost out of sight. I change my approach into turn 2 by turning in later for a deeper apex and more drive past the blockade of bikes keeping me from the other Photo Credit: Zayas ImageThruxtons, and it works. I pass 3 riders all before the braking zone of turn 3 and with Walt’s rear tire in my sights I brake later than I ever have setting me up for an overtaking of #552 entering the turn and an overtaking of #112 exiting. Turn 4 approaches and I’ve already upshifted to 3rd gear and back down to 4th within a matter of seconds. The tire chirps and steps out as a tip into the right hander all while being certain Paul will overtaking me on the inside, but he wasn’t there. Turn after turn I never look back, I’m yelling in my helmet. The bump in turn 7 sends me wide over the rumble strips and I yell “YeeHaa!” (cheesy as all hell but true). My smile fills every bit of the visor making it almost difficult to see through my squinting eyes. Lap after lap I get more comfortable. The bike wallows and slides and grinds parts off but it feels like it was meant to do this. As I turn laps my mind drifts to what this bike’s life was before. 8,082 miles of weekend rides, maybe a few rides to work, maybe a 2-up date night ride, a few bike nights, maybe a poker run or two. I’m giving this bike a whole new life, a new chapter and both the bike and I are loving every second of it. As I come down the front straight the last time I lay on my horn in celebration, look to the right and see the rest of the riders way behind, 27 seconds behind to be exact. I had consistently run low 2:08s where the lap record for a fully race prepped Thruxton Cup bike is 2:04 flat.

Photo Credit: Zayas ImageThen it hits me, I’ve been planning on writing these articles to say how this bike is pretty good stock but desperately needs additions to really enjoy it on the track, but I was dead wrong. Sure I’m still going to upgrade suspension, exhaust, tuning, etc. but it’s not necessary at all to go out, have fun and kick some ass!

The sun rises on the second day revealing that the track is soaking from an overnight storm, it’s going to be a wet race. This time Paul Canale’s not racing but my brother, Zach, is. Zach and I line up next to each other on the grid and both of us have a great launch. Lap 1, lap 2, lap 3 and Zach is right on my tail, our times are slower due to the conditions but we’re sliding the rear tire through turns as we lose then regain traction. The race between Zach and me becomes simply one of endurance, who can hold on to our sliding pace longer. I finally pull away in the last lap and take gold one more time.
Photo Credit: Zayas Image
What makes someone fast is not what they ride, but how they ride it. How willing they are to push. How late they brake and how early they twist the throttle. How smooth they are and how they respond to all of the little bits of data the bike sending back to them. Photo Credit: Zayas Image

I’m not done with this bike yet, next thing up is suspension. If I plan on beating the Thruxton Cup lap record at NOLA I’ll need to have more control than I currently have. There are many options out there and I’ll be doing my research to make sure I’ve got the best available.

Follow my progress, as we have miles and miles, and laps and laps to go

Maxwell Materne

   

 

                                                                                          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo Credit: Zayas Image

 

 

 

 


The Birth of a Thruxton Cup Bike

By Maxwell Materne
on January 28, 2015

Thruxton Cup racing is the kind of thing that gets in your veins.  Imagine getting off from a long day's work, grabbing an overstuffed backpack and hopping in a van jam packed with race bikes.  You're excited to participate in Vintage Fest, a bit scared to race in it but dreading the 5 hour night time drive.  At about 10PM you arrive to the gates of the Barber Motorsports Park and drive the hilly access road to the racer pit area.  Pull up to your pit spot to find that a party has broken out, excited racers, amazing barbecue even umbrella girls.  The people you're meeting now will become family to you for the rest of your life.  

 

This was the initial experience I had back in 2013 and ever since the moment when all of the Thruxton Cup racers welcomed me there was no way I wouldn't live this experience again.  The camaraderie, the competition, the racetracks, all of them made me excited to race in the 2014 season.  Both British Customs and BES Racing were kind enough to sponsor me for a number of races throughout the year, including Willow Springs and Barber Motorsports.  With the last race of the 2014 season at NOLA I was able to take home a few trophies that only made me want more for 2015.

 

This year started with purchasing my very own Thruxton in order to compete in more races, but the first of the season is fast approaching, this weekend!  Without enough time to prepare my bike for battle I've decided to race it bone stock, see how I do then modify based on my needs.  Here's where I'm starting:

An unadulterated 2008 Triumph Thruxton.  It has some accessories so far and a few of them will be just what I need.

A steering damper is required in all racing so fortunately the previous owner had the intuition to put one on already.

LSL engine sliders are a perfect addition to both race and street bikes as they keep the case covers from being punctured if the bike was to go down.  

 

A few more trinkets were added and fortunately none of them were illegal for the spec class of Thruxton Cup.  There was only one thing I needed to change to make race ready, and I certainly wasn't going to be making any exceptions on and that's tires.

 

These new tires are still DOT street tires but a bit grippier than the Metzlers that came stock.  A Continental Road Attack II for the front and a Bridgestone BT003 rear were my first choice as they were the ones I had raced on all last year with not one hiccup.  

 

Here's the first dyno run of the bike.  62 hp isn't bad but those bumps will require some tuning to remove.  Most Thruxton Cup bikes run between 65 hp and 70 hp so I'm starting with a bit more of a disadvantage but as I tune I'll keep writing more articles that share horsepower, lap times and race results.  

There are just a few small changes I have to make to pass tech and they are as follows:

  • Safety wire oil fill
  • Safety wire oil drain
  • Safety wire oil filter
  • Safety wire bake caliper bolts
  • Safety wire axle bolts
  • Safety wire axle pinch bolts
    • Install belly pan from British Customs
    • Tape up all of my lights

    There are a few more things I have to do in order to pass tech for an official Thruxton Cup scheduled event, but for WERA this'll do just fine.  After this quick work I'm ready to race!  Make sure to come out to NOLA Motorsports Park this Saturday January 31 and/or Sunday February 1 to see how I will stack up on a bone stock Triumph Thruxton against an arsenal of fully prepped, engine tuned, suspension upgraded race bikes.  Should make for an interesting show. 

     

     

    Max Materne

     

     

    Understanding suspension | Upgrading your Triumph modern classic

    By Maxwell Materne
    on December 04, 2014

    The point of a motorcycle’s suspension is to both absorb the road’s imperfections and keep consistent traction with the asphalt.  But how does it work?

    To understand the principles of suspension there are 2 different things to discuss: springs and damping.  The springs used in both front forks and in rear shocks are the same type of coil springs you would find in a pen or in a mattress, just much stronger.   What prevents the spring from continuously oscillating is the suspension’s damping characteristics.  

    Let’s look at a VERY simplified diagram how suspension works:


     

     

     

    There are 3 main components in this image to pay attention to; the oil, the valve and the damper rod.  The valve is on the end of the damper rod and is pushed through the oil as the damper rod is moved up and down.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     



    As we push the damper rod up into the shock we can see that oil is passing through the valve.  The rate at which this oil passes through the valve is determined by the size of the holes in the valve and by the viscosity of the oil.

     

     

     

     

     










     

     

     

     

    The effect is the same in reverse for most stock shocks like those found on the Triumph Bonneville.  With shocks like these the rate at which the valve plunges through the oil is not adjustable nor can the oil be changed in order to get a different amount of damping from the shock.  








     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Now let’s add the spring into the mix.  For every action (hitting a bump and the shock compressing) there is an equal but opposite reaction (the spring returning to its original length - rebounding).  


    Let’s discuss the Triumph modern classic line specifically.  The Bonneville, Scrambler and T100 have absolutely no adjustability while the Thruxton only has fork preload adjustability.  Preload is the amount of tension that is put onto the springs in order compensate for rider weight.  Our TTRNO Level 1 suspension package addresses the issue of preload adjustability and spring rate.  


    TTRNO’s Level 1 suspension kit for Triumph Modern Classics consists of:

    • Preload adjustable front fork caps
    • Progressive fork springs
    • Hagon preload adjustable rear shocks


    Preload adjustability is the first step in getting a motorcycle set up for you, but this Level 1 kit goes a step above by installing a spring with a progressive rate.  Let’s discuss spring rates…

     



    The above spring is a standard flat-rate spring.  These springs are  used in stock applications because they are cheap to produce and easy to tune.  They work great for setting up a bike for the track, but are not ideal for a comfortable street ride.  That’s where the progressive springs come in…

     

     

    Progressive springs are wound at a different rate throughout the length of the spring.  This allows for an increase in suspension “stiffness” as more force is applied.  On the road this allows for small bumps to be absorbed under a very light spring rate and more aggressive bumps to be controlled at a higher rate.  In other words, a soft ride without bottoming out.  

    Suspension level 1 price with parts and installation $920.




    TTRNO’s Level 2 suspension kit for Triumph Modern Classics consists of:

    • Preload adjustable front fork caps
    • Rider weight specific flat-rate springs
    • RaceTech Gold Valve front fork cartridge emulators
    • Ohlins S36DR1L shocks


    What makes Level 2’s components more advanced is the ability to adjust not only the spring preload but also the rebound damping.  Remember how damping is controlled by the valve on the damper rod?  Well, the rate at which the shock compresses and rebounds can be tuned by the size of the orifices in the valve.  RaceTech’s Gold Valve kit is able to tune both compression and rebound damping by both changing the size and shape of the valve orifices and by changing a series of shims that sit on both sides of the valve.  These shims help tune damping by their rate of deflection as fork oil passes them.  For simplicity’s sake I’ll leave it to RaceTech to explain the rest:  http://www.racetech.com/page/title/Emulators-How%20They%20Work.


    The rear shocks for Level 2 are made by the world-famous Ohlins suspension company.  They are preload, rebound and height adjustable with larger and more advanced valves than those used in Level 1’s Hagon shocks.  Adjustability is externally done meaning that changes in road conditions can be tuned quickly and easily.  

    Suspension level 2 price with parts and installation $2,300.





    TTRNO’s Level 3 suspension kit for Triumph Modern Classics consists of:

    • Traxxion Dynamics AK-20 Axxion cartridge kit for front forks
    • Rider weight specific flat-rate springs
    • Ohlins S36PR1C1LB shocks


    The set of components in Level 3 is all you need to make your suspension FULLY adjustable with preload, rebound and compression.  One of the largest advantages of the AK-20 cartridge kits is that rebound and compression damping can be externally controlled unlike that of the RaceTech Gold Valve kit.  This allows suspension tuning to be as simple as turning a few screws rather than taking apart the front forks.  Ohlins’ S36PR1C1LB shocks have an external “piggy back” reservoir to keep oil temperature and viscosity consistent.  All of the adjusters on these shocks are a simple turn of a knob with no need for difficult spanner wrenches and the damping control is so intricate that any and all traction characteristics can be tuned perfectly.  The amount of adjustability provided in this kit is the same as that of full factory race bikes and these components are by far the best on the market.  Take it from me, if you want the best suspension components on your Triumph Modern Classic, this is the kit!

    Suspension level 3 price with parts and installation $3,900.



    Maxwell Materne

    2014 WERA Thruxton Cup National Champion

     

    Back to Tech Center

    Tech talk: How Vespa Automatic Transmissions Work

    By Zachary Materne
    on January 27, 2012

    Just about once a day I surprise someone by saying that all new Vespas are automatic.  Twist and go, nothing to it, easiest thing in the world to ride.  Inevitably it’s followed by the question of, “how does that work?”  It’s really quite simple and ingenious; first let’s get an understanding of some of the principles behind gearing.

     

    Read more »

    TTRNO's Max Materne & JT Nesbitt Begin Cross-Country Trek In The Magnolia Special

    By Zachary Materne
    on October 21, 2011

    World Famous Motorcycle Designer, and New Orleanian, JT Nesbitt & TTRNO's Max Materne began their trek from NYC to Los Angeles in the custom built Magnolia Special. Their goal is to be the first alternative fuel passenger vehicle (compressed natural gas) to make a trip from coast to coast. You can follow their progress on their facebook & twitter accounts.

    Read more »

    NOLA Motorsports Park.....Almost Ready!

    By Zachary Materne
    on September 30, 2011

    You have heard us talking about NOLA Motorsports for 2 years now, and there is finally light at the end of the tunnel. NOLA Motorsports Park is a motorsports utopia currently under construction just 20 minutes from downtown in Avondale, LA. The facility will offer two full road courses (when combined make the longest road course in North America), kart facitily, autocross pad, high performance driving & riding schools, track days, kart rentals, driver education courses, spectator events, hot laps and much more. NOLA will rival any motorsports complex in North America.

    Read more »

    Ethanol vs. Fuel Treatments (K100 Success Story)

    By Maxwell Materne
    on August 18, 2011

    Check out our update!!

    What is ethanol? Ethanol, currently found in most fuel, is the same kind of alcohol in your pantry but distilled to the point where it is nearly pure. The United States ethanol industry is largely based on corn ground into “meal” and paired with enzymes to convert it’s starch to simple sugars. Yeast is added and the combination is distilled then dehydrated to produce a 200 proof alcohol (a small amount of gasoline is added to keep this undrinkable.) Ethanol is highly miscible meaning that it attracts water, and because of this is can not be transported in pipelines, rather it is added to gasoline filled tanker trucks before delivery to gas stations.

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    TTRNO Draws a Crowd at Magnolia Special Debut

    By Nick Napoda
    on August 15, 2011

    TTRNO's Annual Summer Open House was another successful event this year with the unveiling of designer JT Nesbitt's Magnolia Special. The hand build aluminium, natural gas powered, car attracted hundreds of admirers. The car with built with the assistance of TTRNO's Max Materne. Max desiged, and installed, the cars entire electrical system.

    Read more »

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